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A Reflective Approach (2007). A bronze sculpture by sculptor Kevin Atherton. Viewed from the rear, a figure is pushing a stainless steel sphere towards the canal. Depicting the continually struggling human form.

 

A Reflective Approach (2007). A bronze sculpture by sculptor Kevin Atherton. Viewed from the rear, a figure is pushing a stainless steel sphere towards the canal. Depicting the continually struggling human form.

 

A Reflective Approach (2007). A bronze sculpture by sculptor Kevin Atherton. Viewed from the rear, a figure is pushing a stainless steel sphere towards the canal. Depicting the continually struggling human form.

 

 

 

A Reflective Approach (2007)

Kevin Atherton

Genre: Sculpture

Article by: Dave Roberts - First Published: 24 March 2011

Location: Clarence Dock, Leeds

Biography: Kevin Atherton
Born in 1950 in the Isle of Man.
Studied at the Isle of Man College of Art 1968-69
Leeds Polytechnic, Fine Art Department 1969-72

He was on the panel of Assessors for the Arts Council of England 'Arts for Everyone' Lottery Fund 1997-99.

Following a long period of teaching at Chelsea College of Art and Design 1982-98, Kevin Atherton was appointed the first Head of Media Department at the National College of Art and Design, Dublin in January 2000.

Kevin Atherton has exhibited widely since 1972, including performances and video and virtual reality installations in the UK, France, Belgium, the Netherlands and the USA. His work is in numerous public collections and he has received many awards.

His best known public commissions include 'A Body of Work' (ten life size bronze sections of pupils and staff commissioned by Tower Hamlets for Langdon Park School, Poplar); Three Bronze Deckchairs (Serpentine, London and Liverpool Garden Festival) 1984, the 1986 Platform Piece for Brixton Railway Station, and Iron Horses 1987, a sculpture in twelve parts commissioned by British Rail and the West Midlands County Council for the Birmingham to Wolverhampton railway corridor. And now A Reflective Approach, Clarence Dock, Leeds 2007.

A Reflective Approach is a two-part sculpture consisting of two life-size bronze figures pushing two reflective stainless steel spheres towards a canal, depicting the continually struggling human form.

The figures were cast from seventeen-year-old Max Langlands. As the figure pushes the ball closer to the canal side the ball increases in size and thus, in the manner of Sisyphus, increases the difficulty of the task.

Sisyphean task

As a punishment from the gods for his trickery, Sisyphus was made to roll a huge boulder up a steep hill, but before he could reach the top of the hill, the rock would always roll back down, forcing him to begin again. The maddening nature of the punishment was reserved for Sisyphus due to his hubristic belief that his cleverness surpassed that of Zeus. As a result when Sisyphus was condemned to his punishment, Zeus displayed his own cleverness by binding Sisyphus to an eternity of frustration with the boulder rolling away from Sisyphus when he neared the top of the hill. Accordingly, pointless or interminable activities are often described as Sisyphean. Sisyphus was a common subject for ancient writers and was depicted by the painter Polygnotus on the walls of the Lesche at Delphi.

 

Try these links to search the following topics:

Kevin Atherton | Sculpture | A Reflective Approach (2007)

 

Credits to:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sisyphus

http://www.forestofdean-sculpture.org.uk/

http://ncadpostgraduate.com/

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